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Promotion of the Humanities_Research - #45.161

Collaborative Research and Scholarly Editions and Translations grants support up to three years of research. Awards support direct costs, including salaries, travel, supplies, and appropriate research assistance and consultation. Grants also support fellowships offered through independent research centers and institutions.




Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No. A-122 for nonprofit organizations and OMB Circular No. A-21 for educational institutions. OMB Circular No. A-87 applies to this program.

For Collaborative Research, the principal criteria considered by evaluators are: (1) Intellectual significance of the project, including its potential contribution to scholarship in the humanities; the likelihood that it will stimulate new research; its relationship to larger themes in the humanities; and the significance of the material on which the project is based. (2) Pertinence of the research questions being posed, the appropriateness of research methods or conference design; the appropriateness of the technology employed in the project; the feasibility of the work plan;; and the appropriateness of the field work to be undertaken, the archival or source materials to be studied, and the research site. (3) Qualifications, expertise, and levels of commitment of the project director and key project staff or contributors. (4) Soundness of the dissemination and access plans, including benefit to the audience identified in the proposal and the strength of the case for employing print, digital format, or a combination of media; and in the case of archaeology projects, the likelihood that the project will produce an interpretive study. All other considerations being equal, preference will be given to projects that provide free, online access to digital materials produced with grant funds. (5) Potential for success, including the likelihood that the work proposed will be completed within the projected time frame; where appropriate, the project's previous record of success; and the reasonableness of the proposed budget in relation to anticipated results. For Scholarly Editions and Translations, the principal criteria considered by evaluators are: (1) The intellectual significance of the proposed work, including its potential contribution to scholarship in the humanities; the likelihood that it will stimulate new research; its relationship to larger themes or issues in the humanities; and the significance of the material on which the project is based. (2) The appropriateness of the research methods, critical apparatus, and editorial policies; in the case of translation projects, the translation approaches; the appropriateness of selection criteria; the thoroughness and feasibility of the work plan; the quality of the samples, e.g., their content, accuracy; readability, and the clarity and helpfulness of annotation. (3) The qualifications, expertise, and levels of commitment of the project director and key project staff or contributors. (4) The soundness of the dissemination and access plans, including benefit to the audience identified in the proposal; the strength of the case for producing print volumes, electronic format, or a combination of media; and the appropriateness of the technology to be used. All other considerations being equal, preference will be given to projects that provide free, online access to digital materials produced with grant funds. (5) The potential for success, including the likelihood that the proposed project will be successfully completed within the projected time frame; when appropriate, the edition or translation’s previous record of success; and the reasonableness of the budget in relation to its likely results. For Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions, the principal criteria considered by evaluators are: (1) How important to the advancement of the humanities is the fellowship program for which funding is requested? (2) Are fellows likely to pursue their research more successfully because of the research collections, facilities, services, and other resources provided by the applicant institution? In the case of centers with residential programs, does the application provide evidence that the fellows' projects benefit significantly from the location of the center and the intellectual exchange among the fellows? (3) How strong is the institution's previous record in offering fellowships? Have former fellows been productive? Have the scholarly contributions resulting from their FPIRI fellowships been of value to scholars and general audiences in the humanities? (4) Is the fellowship selection process, including the choosing of selection committee members, expert and objective? (5) Does the application make a persuasive case for the amount of NEH support requested for fellowships? (6) How effective is the publicity for the competition for fellowships? (7) How effective is the administration of the fellowship program? Is the institution's research misconduct policy adequate? (8) Are there ways in which the fellowship program could be improved?.

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